Current Exhibitions

Divine in Ecstasy.

John Waters: Indecent Exposure

Now through January 6, 2019

See the first retrospective of John Waters's visual arts career in his hometown of Baltimore.



Children viewing Ronald Moody’s Midonz (1937) at The Baltimore Museum of Art’s Contemporary Negro Art exhibition. 1939.

1939: Exhibiting Black Art at the BMA

Now through October 28, 2018

In 1939, the BMA presented one of the first major exhibitions in the U.S. to feature African American artists. Contemporary Negro Art, served “as a declaration of principles as to what art should be in a democracy and as a gauge of how far in this particular province we have gone and may need to go…,” wrote renowned African American philosopher and art critic Alain Locke in the exhibition brochure. Nearly 80 years later, the BMA pays tribute to this landmark exhibition with 14 prints and drawings by African American artists who were included in the 1939 show.



Ann Veronica Janssens. Rose #43. 2007-2018.

Ann Veronica Janssens: Fog Star

Now through October 31, 2018

Ann Veronica Janssens’s installation transforms the interior of the Spring House on the Museum’s west lawn, drawing visitors into the neoclassical building with a hazy glow of brilliantly hued light.



Installation view, Meleko Mokgosi: Acts of Resistance. Photography by Mitro Hood.

Meleko Mokgosi: Acts of Resistance

Now through November 11, 2018

Meleko Mokgosi produces large-scale figurative paintings that rethink the tradition of historical European compositions. He appropriates the polyptych formats and shapes of altarpieces and paintings used for the decoration of churches and other grand interiors and deploys paintings to present historical narratives and allegories. However, Mokgosi’s subjects come from African history, representing people and historical moments that do not appear within the canon of Western art history.



Kómó Society Helmet Mask (Kómókum). Manding or Miniakna peoples (Mali or Guinea). Early 20th century.

Subverting Beauty: African Anti-Aesthetics

Now through November 17, 2019

This exhibition features approximately two dozen works from sub-Saharan African’s colonial period (c.1880-c. 1960) that are accumulative, composite, crude, counterintuitive, and disproportionate. More importantly still, it explores the reasons why artists working during this turbulent period in the continent’s history turned against beauty in order to express the meaning and vitality of their day-to-day existence.



Installation view of Maren Hassinger: The Spirit of Things at Art + Practice, Los Angeles

Maren Hassinger: The Spirit of Things

Now through November 25, 2018

For more than four decades, New York-based artist Maren Hassinger has explored relationships between the industrial and natural worlds in a practice that is both meditative and critical. This exhibition represents a broad range of her work with abstract compositions, videos, and documentary photographs.



Lizzie Fitch / Ryan Trecartin

Now through January 6, 2019

Experience the frenzied, social media-inspired films and sculptural theaters of influential collaborators Lizzie Fitch and Ryan Trecartin.

Ryan Trecartin, Permission Streak, 2016 (HD Video, duration 21:17). Courtesy of Ryan Trecartin; Regen Projects, Los Angeles; Sprüth Magers.



Tomás Saraceno: Entangled Orbits

Now through January 13, 2019

"Get lost in immersive, iridescent works that evoke giant bubbles, spider webs, and clouds in a clash of beauty and strength." —Baltimore Magazine



Unidentified Kuba Artist. Overskirt. 20th Century.

Kuba: Fabric of an Empire

Now through February 24, 2019

This exhibition of dazzling Kuba textiles presented in the BMA’s Cone Collection galleries reveals how a central African kingdom independently developed a form of modernist abstraction in the 20th century.



Mark Bradford: Tomorrow Is Another Day

Now through March 3, 2019

Originally presented at the U.S. Pavilion at the 2017 Venice Biennale, Mark Bradford’s Tomorrow Is Another Day was born out of his ongoing interest in the inherently social nature of the material world we inhabit. Bradford (American, b. 1961) recycles ordinary materials in an homage to a shared American experience, recalling memories of his mother’s hair salon or the streets of Los Angeles. In its U.S. debut, this exhibition takes on new meaning within the context of the Baltimore community and speaks to the artist’s belief in art as a platform to examine contradictory histories and effect positive change.



Ebony G. Patterson: ...for little whispers...

Now through April 7, 2019

Ebony G. Patterson's immersive installation in the Berman Textile gallery memorializes children killed in violent crimes, while asking what it means that society treats some bodies as valuable and others as expendable.

Ebony G. Patterson, ...and babies too..., 2016, mixed media jacquard woven tapestry with digitally-embroidered appliques, hand-embellished cast glass shoes, and toys mounted on custom painted wood plinth, 120 x 58 in. (304.8 x 147.3 cm). Made in collaboration with Temple Contemporary at Tyler School of Art, Philadelphia. Courtesy the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago



PDPS 50th Anniversary

Now through October 6, 2019

In the fall of 2018, the BMA’s oldest friends group, the Print, Drawing & Photograph Society (PDPS), will celebrate its 50th anniversary by sponsoring an exhibition to highlight a selection of late 19th-century, modern, and contemporary works on paper that PDPS has helped the BMA acquire over the years.



Spencer Finch. Moon Dust (Apollo 17). 2009.

Spencer Finch: Moon Dust

Now through October 14, 2024

Spencer Finch’s impressive light installation Moon Dust (Apollo 17), first presented at the 2009 Venice Biennale, will illuminate the BMA’s majestic Fox Court for the next seven years.

Moon Dust (Apollo 17) is on extended loan from the collection of Joanne Gold and Andrew Stern, who are generously sponsoring its presentation at the BMA.



Collection Galleries

A gallery shot of Oppenheimer's periscope-esque artwork installed in the museum.

Sarah Oppenheimer: Architectural intervention

For this two-part work, artist Sarah Oppenheimer inserted meticulously crafted aluminum and reflective glass between the 2nd and 3rd floors of the Contemporary Wing and through the wall between the contemporary and Cone collections.

An installation shot of the new American Wing.

American Art

The American Wing includes more than 800 paintings, sculptures, and decorative arts that explore the international character of American art and Baltimore's position as a major center for art production and foreign trade from the late 18th century forward.

Contemporary Art

The Contemporary Wing features more than 100 paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, and moving image works, creating thought-provoking encounters with contemporary art.

An image of the Cone wing, with many colorful Matisse's adorning the gallery
		walls.

Cone Collection

The Cone Collection of modern art is the crown jewel of the BMA, featuring works by Matisse, Picasso, Pissarro, Courbet, and Degas.

Collected by Baltimore sisters Claribel and Etta Cone from the early-mid 20th century, the Cone Collection is one of the world’s most important art collections.

A statue of an angry camel with two humps.

Asian Art

Discover 2,000 years of innovation by Chinese artists from 2nd century BCE to today in this presentation of the Asian art collection. Two galleries feature ceramics, furniture, and painting, as well as bronze, jade, and lacquer objects that showcase the beauty and strength of Chinese art.

Unknown Artist. The Match Race at York (detail). (n.d.). William Woodward Collection. The Baltimore Museum of Art, BMA 1956.253.

English Sporting Art

Considered one of the finest collections of British sporting art in America, the BMA’s Woodward Collection features 52 paintings of horses and racing scenes, as well as silver and gold racing trophies.

A gallery shot of the installation.

European Art

This installation features the monumental Rinaldo and Armida, one of the world's finest paintings by Sir Anthony van Dyck, as well as masterpieces by Frans Hals, Rembrandt van Rijn, and Jean Baptiste Siméon Chardin.

A visitor examining an African mask.

African Art

The BMA's presentation of its renowned African art collection emphasizes the relationships between 85 incredible works, many large-scale, and the lives of the people by and for whom the objects were made. Artists and diverse traditions from more than 40 African empires, kingdoms, and regions are represented.