Stripes and Stars: Reclaiming Lakota Independence

From October 11, 2020 — March 28, 2021

5f734eef7cc26 Stripes and Stars: Reclaiming Lakota Independence stripes-and-stars-reclaiming-lakota-independence /images/exhibitions/large/Lakota_vest_exhpg.jpg /images/exhibitions/large/Lakota_vest_exhpg.jpg Image: Unidentified Lakota artist (United States). Boy’s Vest. Late 19th century. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of Mrs. Richard W. Case, Sparks, Maryland, BMA 1985.162 1 2020-10-11T00:00:00-05:00 2021-03-28T00:00:00-05:00

By the late 1800s, the United States government had confined the Lakota people of North and South Dakota to reservations and had taken away their freedom to roam the plains, hunt buffalo, and practice their religion. Surprisingly, during this same period Lakota women began incorporating the American flag and patriotic iconography into traditional beadwork designs.

This exhibition explores the multifaceted meanings of the American flag through nine beaded artworks created by Lakota women in the early Reservation Period. While the American flag was a symbol of oppression for Native Americans, Lakota women subversively incorporated it into children’s clothing and other traditional items so that tribal members could participate in cultural activities that had been previously outlawed. It also served as a protective talisman for Lakota youth.

Curated by Darienne Turner, Assistant Curator of Indigenous Art of the Americas.

The exhibition is supported by the Estate of Margaret Hammond Cooke.

Land Acknowledgment

As part of The Baltimore Museum of Art’s ongoing broad range of initiatives related to diversity, equity, accessibility, and inclusion, the Museum recognizes that we occupy land that generations of Indigenous people reside upon and have stewarded. The BMA is committed to engaging with local historians, scholars, and—most importantly—Indigenous people in the coming years to reflect on our obligations to and relationship with this land, its history, and its people.

Learn more about the history and peoples of the land you live on and land acknowledgments with these resources.

Native Land

Dive into a crowd-sourced map of Indigenous peoples, languages, and related treaties that this Canadian nonprofit has produced. Use this map, as well as a teacher resource full of lessons for many ages, to extend your knowledge.

Native Knowledge 360°

The National Museum of the American Indian has extensive resources for students and teachers that were created with Native communities, to reflect a contemporary and historical understanding of Indigenous presence. This Smithsonian museum has its own land acknowledgment and an instructional resource to contextualize the statement.

U.S. Department of Arts and Culture

This grassroots organization dedicated to pursuing equity, empathy, and belonging through creativity, has created a guide that you can use to begin drafting a land acknowledgment.

By the late 1800s, the United States government had confined the Lakota people of North and South Dakota to reservations and had taken away their freedom to roam the plains, hunt buffalo, and practice their religion. Surprisingly, during this same period Lakota women began incorporating the American flag and patriotic iconography into traditional beadwork designs.

Image: Unidentified Lakota artist (United States). Boy’s Vest. Late 19th century. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of Mrs. Richard W. Case, Sparks, Maryland, BMA 1985.162